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Life Makeover for the Year 2015

Week 14 – How To Survive A Shame Attack

March 29, 2015

Greetings!

Now and then, as I finish editing my next book, I’m choosing to republish popular blogs.  This week’s choice generated a lot of mail from readers when it ran back in March of 2014. 

I hope it’s a message that supports you in some way this week.

I’m live on the radio Monday (3/30) at 5pm ET/2pm PT and I’ll be taking your calls at (866) 254-1579.  You can join my by listening here: HayHouseRadio.com

Have a good week!

Love,

Cheryl

p.s. – Need a little Divine Direction? Use the “Touch of Grace” button on our homepage here.

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How to survive a shame attack.

Yesterday I had a shame attack.

I woke up after a long night’s sleep, recovering from leading a retreat, and found a post on Facebook from an angry participant who called me rude and suggested that I was a fraud.

Ouch.

I finished reading the post (about ten times in the hopes that I was misreading the message and it would magically transform into something nice), and soon felt the familiar fire of shame rise up from my stomach into my face, scorching everything in its path.

A public slap down.
Humiliated.
Embarrassed.
Feeling exposed.

A horrible human being for hurting someone’s feelings.

I lay in bed for a long time racking my brains to remember the person and the encounter, but I had no recollection whatsoever. So, I deleted the post and went back to sleep in an effort to escape the death grip of shame.

That’s when something magical happened.

For the first time since her death, my friend Debbie Ford came to me in a dream. I didn’t see her but I could feel her presence and then I heard…

“You are rude, Cheryl.
And you’re a bitch, too.
And while we’re at it,
sometimes you can be
short with people,
and a little too critical,
and harsh and abrupt
in ways that hurt.”

I listened as she filled my consciousness with her words.

“Until you can embrace this truth about yourself, you’ll always be afraid of hearing it from others. Remember, we are all everything and what you can’t be with won’t let you be.”

I woke from the dream feeling a wave of cool relief wash over me.

Debbie was right.

I am rude.
I am harsh and critical.
I am abrupt and impatient and too quick to cut people off sometimes, especially with the pressure of managing a large group experience.
And while I would never intentionally hurt anyone, the truth is I sometimes do.

There you have it.

It’s not easy to look at the unattractive parts of us. But face them and embrace them we must if we’re committed to self-love and wholeness.

I have to be honest. I’m no longer interested in trying to be the “Queen of Nice.” It’s exhausting, not to mention impossible. I’m more interested in being me – all of me – good and bad, light and dark, kind and crappy.

And if I hurt someone along the way, I’m truly sorry. I’m a work in progress, too.

I hope this story helps you to be softer with your rough edges. We could all use a little more love.

Thank you Debbie Ford, author of the beautiful book, The Dark Side of the Light Chasers. Thank you for keeping me on the path to wholeness, even from the other side.

I still miss you dear friend…

Every single day… heart-icon

debbie ford

This Week’s Video

This week’s video is interesting – a little anxious-making at first, but it ends well. You can see it here. Thanks, Kelly!